Mr. Electric - safety http://www.33pulse.com/taxonomy/term/16 en What You Need to Know About AFCI and GFCI Outlets http://www.33pulse.com/blog/what-you-need-to-know-about-afci-and-gfci-outlets <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>What You Need to Know About AFCI and GFCI Outlets</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-what-you-need-to-know-about-afci-gfci-outlets.jpg?itok=bZ7OmoY8" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-what-you-need-to-know-about-afci-gfci-outlets.jpg?itok=bZ7OmoY8" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 4:03pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Across the U.S. approximately 4,400 people are injured and an additional 400 die each year resulting from electrical hazards annually. Add in electrical fire,?and you have what results in an estimated $1.6 billion in property damage each year. Could these accidents have been prevented? When it comes to electrical safety, what you don’t know can hurt you.</p> <h2><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-outlets">Is your home or business missing these crucial electrical safety devices?</a></h2> <h3>GFCI Outlets</h3> <p>GFCI stands for ground fault circuit interrupter.?A GFCI is required in any areas with an increased risk of shock due to electrical hazards, such as water. In order to protect you from electrical hazards, a GFCI monitors electrical current, turning off an electrical circuit when it detects an imbalance - current flowing along an unintended path. Think of a GFCI as a small, extra-sensitive circuit breaker built right into an outlet to protect you against electrocution – even in outlets that are not grounded. GFCIs are currently required for use in:</p> <ul><li>Bathrooms</li> <li>Kitchens</li> <li>Laundry and utility rooms</li> <li>Garages</li> <li>Crawlspaces and unfinished basements</li> <li>Wet bars</li> <li>The exterior of your home/business</li> <li>Spa and pool areas</li> </ul><p><strong><em>Note:</em></strong><em> Never use GFCI outlets with refrigerators, freezers, or other appliances, as they could trip without your knowledge.</em></p> <h3>AFCI Outlets</h3> <p>AFCIs stand for arc-fault circuit interrupters, and they?protect you from electrical dangers, but of a different variety – those that create heat via arcing. Examples include a rodent chewing on a wire, driving a nail through a wire, or a device overheating where it is plugged into the wall. AFCIs detect this arcing, shutting down outlets before damage can occur. They are not found in wall receptacles like GFCIs, but instead are easily incorporated into your home or business’ main service panel in the form of specialized circuit breakers. AFCIs are required in:</p> <ul><li>Bedrooms</li> <li>Any sleeping area: dens, foldout couches, etc.</li> <li>Kitchens</li> <li>Laundry areas</li> </ul><h2><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/circuit-breaker-replacement">Do I really need to upgrade my outlets and breakers? </a></h2> <p>Though you may have an older home or business where building codes do not require these outlets, proper home safety does. Regular outlets and circuit breakers are designed to protect the house's electrical system, not people. With these devices being so easy and inexpensive to install, why wouldn’t you want to protect yourself and others from the unnecessary electrical hazards overlooking them presents?</p> <h2><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-code-updates">Recent electrical code updates regarding these devices you may not be aware of:</a></h2> <p>As of 2014, the National Electric Code (NEC), the nation’s singular code for safe electrical installation, has added the following standards for the safety of your home or business:</p> <ul><li> <h4>GFCI protection for laundry areas</h4> <p>All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in a laundry room now require GFCI protection, whether or not a sink is present.</p> </li> <li> <h4>GFCI protection for kitchen dishwashers</h4> <p>As dishwashers age, the risk of electrical shock increases, thus the latest requirement for GFCI protection on all dishwashers, whether they use a receptacle outlet or are hardwired in.</p> </li> <li> <h4>AFCI protection for kitchen and laundry areas</h4> <p>As of 2014, the NEC has recently added kitchen and laundry areas to the list of areas requiring AFCI protection. This includes all 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits supplying not just outlets but also devices found in these rooms.</p> </li> </ul><p>Shocked by how inadequately prepared for electrical hazards your home or business is? Don’t get burned by ignoring the need for these inexpensive, potentially life-saving devices. Contact Mr. Electric? today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/what-you-need-to-know-about-afci-and-gfci-outlets" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Wed, 01 Apr 2015 21:03:37 +0000 Brad Roop 5570 at http://www.33pulse.com How a Surge Protector Works http://www.33pulse.com/blog/how-a-surge-protector-works <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>How a Surge Protector Works</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-how_a_surge_protector_works_0.jpg?itok=ahR0PgwR" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-how_a_surge_protector_works_0.jpg?itok=ahR0PgwR" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Super User</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Wednesday, January 14, 2015 - 4:03pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">Recommended by the National Fire Protection Association and the Institute for Business and Home Safety, surge protectors safeguard electrical devices in your home in the event of power spikes and surges. But how does a surge protector keep your electrical devices safe when all that?amped-up?energy attacks? The science behind the technology isn’t as hard to understand as you might think.</p> <h2>How Surge Protectors Work</h2> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">“When a sudden increase in voltage occurs, such as from a lightning strike or damage to a power line, a surge protector detects the excess current and safely diverts it through the house’s grounding path.” A simple statement and it sounds great, but what does it mean? How does a surge protector know how to do this? To understand that, we just need to simplify a little terminology...</p> <h2>The Vagueness of Electrical Vocabulary</h2> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">Understanding voltage and amperage can help you better grasp how surge protectors work:</p> <ul style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;"><li><strong>Voltage:</strong><br /> Using the analogy of water in a hose, voltage is the equivalent of electrical pressure.</li> <li><strong>Amperage</strong><br /> Using the same analogy, amperage is the flow rate, or amount of fluid running through the hose.</li> </ul><h2>Surge Protectors: Excising the Excess</h2> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">Using our trusty hose analogy, applying too much pressure in a hose can eventually cause it to burst. In the situation of electrical excesses, however, rather than bursting, electrical lines and appliances burn up, or at the very least wear down over time. By diverting excess pressure in the hose (your home’s wires) surge protectors safeguard wiring and appliances. To accomplish this, they need the help of special components.</p> <h2>Managing the Pressure</h2> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">How is all that pressure, or excess electrical energy, diverted? When voltage reaches a certain point, surge protectors simply re-route that extra energy with the help of what is essentially a pressure-sensitive valve. With the correct voltage, current flows through as normal, but with a spike or surge, the device kicks-in immediately and redirects the excess. Commonly used devices for managing this pressure in surge protectors include metal oxide varistors (MOV) and gas discharge arrestors, which allow electrical devices to continue operation while diverting excess energy to grounding wires.</p> <h2>Multi-Layered Protection a Must</h2> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">Due to the nature of surge protection devices, all three of the following surge protection types - or at least Type 2 and Type 3 devices - are needed for adequate protection:</p> <ul style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;"><li><strong>Type 1: Whole House Protection</strong><br /> Installed between the power lines in the street and your meter.</li> <li><strong>Type 2: Whole House Protection</strong><br /> Installed between your meter and breaker box.</li> <li><strong>Type 3: Point-of-Use</strong><br /> Smaller protectors at wall outlets where you plug-in appliances.</li> </ul><h2>Isn’t that overkill??</h2> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">No. A whole house surge protector can’t handle 100 percent of surges.? A small amount of excess voltage can leak up to 15 percent. They also can’t handle surges within your home. They suppress surges from outside sources, such as utility company and transformer issues, but cannot protect against the myriad of surges happening inside your home from your appliances – when your A/C or fridge kick on and off, for instance.</p> <h2>Only as Good as Your Grounding</h2> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">Older homes with ungrounded outlets or homes with improper wiring and grounding will not be helped by a surge protector without the necessary upgrades. Even the best surge protector will fail if there is no proper escape route via grounding for excess electricity to go. If your home has grounding issues, have them addressed quickly, as wiring repair or upgrade costs will pale in comparison to replacing fried appliances.</p> <p style="line-height: 20.7999992370605px;">Amped up about surge protection in your home? Contact Mr. Electric<span style="font-size: 10px; line-height: 0; position: relative; vertical-align: baseline; top: -0.5em;">?</span>?for your free, in-home surge protection quote today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/how-a-surge-protector-works" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Wed, 14 Jan 2015 22:03:48 +0000 Super User 5460 at http://www.33pulse.com

青苹果影院y04080