Mr. Electric - Home Safety http://www.33pulse.com/taxonomy/term/21 en Get Organized and Label Your Electrical Panel http://www.33pulse.com/blog/get-organized-and-label-your-electrical-panel <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Get Organized and Label Your Electrical Panel</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-label-electrical-panel-0419.jpg?itok=NLQ3JFZI" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="825" height="400" alt="Knowing which areas of your home are serviced by which circuit breaker is crucial in case of an emergency. You never know when you might need to shut off the power." /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-label-electrical-panel-0419.jpg?itok=NLQ3JFZI" width="825" height="400" alt="Knowing which areas of your home are serviced by which circuit breaker is crucial in case of an emergency. You never know when you might need to shut off the power." /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Scroggins</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 12:00am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Labeling your electrical panel can save time and confusion. You’ll be able to confidently control any area of your home or business with just the flip of a switch. Here are some tips from <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/waco">Mr. Electric</a> to make this process simple and safe!</p> <p>Knowing which areas of your home are serviced by which circuit breaker is crucial in case of an emergency. You never know when you might need to shut off the power.</p> <p>?</p> <ul><li>Take on the labeling project with a partner. Designate one person to flip the switches in each area, while the other is at the panel testing it. This is the most efficient process.</li> <li>Buy some blank sticky labels to apply on each switch. It’s easier than taping individual papers.</li> <li>First turn off every circuit in your home. Then turn on each one individually to note which light fixture turned on. Label the electrical panel accordingly.</li> <li>Some sections of the electrical panel may not belong to one specific breaker. If this is the case, improper wiring could be the issue. Give <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/waco">Mr. Electric</a> a call if this happens!</li> <li>Clothes dryers and washing machines, water heaters and ovens often require multiple breakers due to the high amount of power required to operate. Don’t be confused if this happens!</li> <li>If you don’t want to write out the labels, numbering them is also a common system. It just depends on preference and what’s easiest for you.</li> </ul><p>?</p> <p>For more information about electrical panels, check out a previous blog from <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/read-electrical-panel">Mr. Electric</a>!</p> <p>This process can be time consuming and a bit frustrating at times, but it will be worth it in the end! For any other questions regarding this process, or you’re dealing with other electrical issues, contact your local <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/">Mr. Electric</a> today!</p> <p>?</p> <p>?</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/get-organized-and-label-your-electrical-panel" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 +0000 Mary Scroggins 6611 at http://www.33pulse.com An Introduction to the Different Types of Electrical Outlets http://www.33pulse.com/blog/an-introduction-to-the-different-types-of-electrical-outlets <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>An Introduction to the Different Types of Electrical Outlets</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicelectricaloutlets.jpg?itok=dp5Bq0Zv" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3000" height="1500" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicelectricaloutlets.jpg?itok=dp5Bq0Zv" width="3000" height="1500" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Scroggins</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, March 16, 2017 - 12:00am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>There are 75 electrical outlets in the average home, of various sizes, shapes, and functionalities. Are the ones gracing your walls the right ones for the job? Here we’ll take a closer look at some of the most common types in your home, including what they have to offer, as well as new home outlet contenders designed to make your space more user-friendly. ? ?</p> <h3><strong>What Are the Most Common American Electrical Outlet Types?</strong></h3> <p><strong>Old &amp; Outdated: 2-Prong Outlets </strong><br /> Common in older homes, this 15 amp, 125 volt, 2-wired outlet is used for ungrounded circuits only, and is rapidly becoming obsolete due to safety and code requirements.</p> <ul><li><strong>Old Faithful: 3 Prong, 15 amp, 125 Volt Outlets</strong><br /> One of the most easily recognized and common outlets found in homes, this outlet features two long, upper slots, with a bottom, upside-down u-shaped slot for grounding, helping to prevent electrical shock should any wiring comes loose. ??</li> <li><strong>Marvelous Multi-Tasker: Switch/Outlet Combos</strong><br /> This winning combination outlet provides two features in a single device. Great for kids rooms and night lights, it can also allow you the ability to transform a receptacle, adding an additional switch or outlet to an existing box - without the need for any added wiring. ?</li> <li><strong>Shockingly Safe: GFCI Outlets</strong><br /> GFCI or Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter outlets are required in areas with close proximity to water, such as bathrooms, the laundry, wet areas of the kitchen, crawlspaces, basements and the outdoors. They prevent electrical current from leaking, monitoring flow, and cutting off power to equipment if current leaks or spikes to a hazardous level. They can be easily identified by the 2 small buttons in the center – a “TEST” button, and a “RESET” button, each of which is in a different color.</li> <li><strong>Large &amp; In-Charge: 20 Amp, 125 Volt Outlets</strong><br /> Used with high current devices as specified by electrical code, such as large kitchen appliances, these outlets are similar in appearance to standard, 15 amp outlets, but with a slightly different look: On these outlets, there is a horizontal slot connected to the top left vertical slot of the outlet. ?</li> <li><strong>The Hobbyist’s Friend: 20 Amp, 250 Volt Outlets</strong><br /> With a design not typical of standard outlets, the unique shape of these outlets is made specifically for air compressors or hobby shop equipment</li> </ul><h3><strong>Newer Types of Electrical Outlets</strong></h3> <p>In addition to the above commonly-used outlet types, there are an array of amazing new outlets. Inexpensive and quickly installed, they offer functionality many of today’s standard outlets do not.</p> <ul><li><strong>USB Outlets</strong><br /> Family fighting over outlets due to mobile-device charging overload? USB outlets offer a functional, simple solution.</li> <li><strong>Recessed Outlets</strong><br /> Add extra space to your home, and banish large gaps between walls and furniture with recessed outlet options.</li> <li><strong>Tamper Resistant Receptacles</strong><br /> A must-have for every home, these specialized outlets are now required by code in newly-built homes, and feature a barrier to prevent children from inserting small objects into them.</li> <li><strong>Built-In LED Night Light Outlets</strong><br /> Keep tiny and fragile night light components away from little fingers with this convenient, safe, nighttime lighting option.</li> </ul><p>Interested in learning more about specialty electrical outlets to better improve the function of your home? Get a closer look at outlet options on our blog, or contact Mr. Electric? today.</p> <p>?</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/an-introduction-to-the-different-types-of-electrical-outlets" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 16 Mar 2017 05:00:00 +0000 Mary Scroggins 6610 at http://www.33pulse.com Avoid The Most Common Electrical Code Violations http://www.33pulse.com/blog/electrical-code-violations <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Avoid The Most Common Electrical Code Violations</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-bloggraphicmostcommonelectricalcodeviolations.jpg?itok=EHrV6q14" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3000" height="1500" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-bloggraphicmostcommonelectricalcodeviolations.jpg?itok=EHrV6q14" width="3000" height="1500" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Jason Lee</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Friday, July 29, 2016 - 3:32pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Whether the problem is an outdated electrical system or one tampered with by an inexperienced DIYer, electrical code violations put your home and family at risk. Discover some code violations that often occur and have your home inspected by a reputable electrician to make sure none of them are endangering your home.</p> <h3><strong>Knob and Tube Wiring</strong></h3> <p><strong>Violation</strong></p> <p>Between the late 1800s and early 1900s, <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/winnipeg/knob-and-tube-wiring" target="_blank">knob and tube wiring</a> was considered state-of-the-art electrical technology. Today knob and tube wiring is considered very dangerous because the wires aren’t grounded, the circuits support lower amperage than is needed today, and the wires feature insulation that disintegrates over time. Because of these issues, most insurance companies refuse to insure buildings with knob and tube wiring.</p> <p><strong>Correction</strong></p> <p>If your home was built before 1950 and the wiring hasn’t been updated, hire an electrician to inspect your home. If evidence of knob and tube wiring is present, you should have the entire house rewired. This can amount to a costly task, but what price do you put on the safety of your home and family?</p> <h3><strong>New Lights Installed onto Old Wiring</strong></h3> <p><strong>Violation</strong></p> <p>A common wiring mistake, new light fixtures can overload old wiring because they run at a hotter temperature. Today, lights are manufactured with wires meant to withstand 90 degrees C, while old wires are rated for just 60 degrees C.</p> <p><strong>Correction</strong></p> <p>If your home has wiring from before 1987, install a splice box and at least three feet of new wiring to connect a new light fixture to old wiring. This prevents you from having to rewire the entire circuit. If you’re unsure how old your wiring is, look for a date stamped on the insulation jacket. Wires manufactured after 1987 have a date; those made before 1987 have no date.</p> <h3><strong>Overcrowding Wires</strong></h3> <p><strong>Violation</strong></p> <p>During the rough-wiring stage, you may be tempted to cram four or five wires through a 7/8-inch hole. This overcrowding leads to “burning,” or damage caused to a wire when its insulation is torn off by another wire dragging across it. Burned wires can go unnoticed, leaving exposed conductors behind your wall and increasing the risk of fire.</p> <p><strong>Correction</strong></p> <p>No more than three wires should run through the same 7/8-inch hole, leaving enough room for wires to shift without burning. Hire an electrician to cut away the damaged wire, install a junction box, and replace the wire between here and the fixture or outlet.</p> <h3><strong>Non-IC-Rated Recessed Lights Touching Insulation</strong></h3> <p><strong>Violation</strong></p> <p>Recessed lights that come in direct contact with attic insulation must be IC-rated. Otherwise, you must keep three inches of space between the light and the insulation. When non-IC-rated lights touch insulation, they can overheat and stop working. Over time, thermal protectors may fail and allow the light to stay on despite extreme heat, potentially lighting the insulation on fire.</p> <p><strong>Correction</strong></p> <p>Check your attic for insulation coming in contact with recessed lights there. Cut back insulation from non-IC-rated lights or replace them with IC-rated versions.</p> <h3><strong>Illegal Splices</strong></h3> <p><strong>Violation</strong></p> <p>A splice is a connection between two or more wires and is one of the worst code violations. The splice is illegal and dangerous if not contained inside a junction box. The only times splices like this can legally occur are for temporary lighting and circuit troubleshooting.</p> <p><strong>Correction</strong></p> <p>If the splice is imperative, hire an electrician to mount a junction box, run the wires into the box, make the splice using wire nuts and install a cover plate over the box.</p> <p>These are just a few of the most common electrical code violations found today. For help correcting code violations in your home so you can improve your family’s safety, please contact <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us" target="_blank">Mr. Electric?</a> today.</p> <p>Need a home service expert? Visit <a href="https://goo.gl/u5YtTj" target="_blank">GetNeighborly.com</a>.?</p> <div class="well well-sm"><em>This blog is made available by Mr. Electric for educational purposes only to give the reader general information and a general understanding on the specific subject above. The blog should not be used as a substitute for a licensed electrical professional in your state or region. Check with city and state laws before performing any household project.</em></div> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/electrical-code-violations" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Fri, 29 Jul 2016 20:32:08 +0000 Jason Lee 6415 at http://www.33pulse.com Never Do This When Using an Electric Blanket http://www.33pulse.com/blog/electric-blanket-safety <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Never Do This When Using an Electric Blanket</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-electric-blanket-safety-0319.jpg?itok=N5NUISwA" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="824" height="400" alt="Never wash your electric blanket and other rules for safe electric blanket use this winter." /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-electric-blanket-safety-0319.jpg?itok=N5NUISwA" width="824" height="400" alt="Never wash your electric blanket and other rules for safe electric blanket use this winter." /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Kimberly Denman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Monday, October 19, 2015 - 10:33pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Now that cooler weather has arrived, you can revel in warm sweaters, cozy socks and comfy blankets. Is your new electric blanket safe to use? ?Follow these simple safety guidelines to ensure your electric blanket doesn’t create a fire hazard.</p> <h4><strong>DO</strong></h4> <ul><li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Choose an electric blanket that conforms to Underwriters Laboratories (UL) standards. This safety certification organization has been testing products and establishing standards for over 100 years.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Lay the heated area of the electric blanket flat rather than folded or balled up so the heat doesn’t become too intense.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Place the blanket on top of you, not under you, to prevent damaging the blanket’s internal coils. Keep other items such as books, pillows and stuffed animals off of the blanket so heat has a way to escape.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Keep pets away from electric blankets, especially while in use. A sharp claw or tooth could puncture the cord insulation or damage the wires.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Turn off the electric blanket when no one is using it. Most models have no internal temperature control, so they will not automatically turn off if they overheat.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Loosely wrap the control cords around the blanket when folding it up for storage.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Turn off and unplug the electric blanket immediately if you see smoke or smell something burning. Blanket discoloration could indicate melting or burning internal elements.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Call the manufacturer for advice if your electric blanket starts operating improperly, such as if one area of the blanket becomes overheated or you see a scorch mark on the blanket. If you can’t resolve the improper operation, discontinue using the product.</li> </ul><h4><strong>DON’T</strong></h4> <ul><li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t use electric blankets on infants or toddlers, people with disabilities, or anyone who can’t operate the heating controls themselves.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don't use an electric blanket all night unless it is specifically rated for safe overnight use.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t run the power cord between the mattress and the box spring when using the electric blanket in bed. This could damage or heat up the cord and potentially cause a fire.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t twist or pinch the control cords since this could damage them. This is also means you shouldn’t use electric blankets with adjustable hospital beds, sofa sleepers, or Murphy beds where the cords could become pinched in the bed-folding mechanisms.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t use an electric blanket on a waterbed.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t use an electric blanket and a heated mattress pad at the same time. The combined warmth could cause overheating and possibly start a fire.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t wash your electric blanket. The twisting and tugging motions of a washing machine are almost certain to damage the internal coils.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t iron your electric blanket. This could melt the cord insulation.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t dry clean your electric blanket. Solvents used in dry cleaning could damage the cord insulation.</li> </ul><p>It may seem like using an electric blanket comes with many do’s and don’ts, but most of them are fairly common sense. Use your electric blanket safely and you’ll enjoy added warmth and coziness this winter.</p> <p>For help with other electrical issues in your home, please contact <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Mr. Electric?</a> today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/electric-blanket-safety" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Tue, 20 Oct 2015 03:33:04 +0000 Kimberly Denman 6272 at http://www.33pulse.com Common Electrical Problems in Your House http://www.33pulse.com/blog/common-electrical-problems <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Common Electrical Problems in Your House</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-common-electrical-problems-in-your-home.jpg?itok=7-reukdJ" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-common-electrical-problems-in-your-home.jpg?itok=7-reukdJ" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Super User</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 2:30pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Have you been disregarding these common electrical problems around your home? You may be able to fix it yourself!</p> <h3><strong>Common Electrical Problems in Your House: Harmless or Hazardous?</strong></h3> <h4><strong>Harmless</strong></h4> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Loose Outlet Plug</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Turn off the breaker. Double check for voltage to the outlet (use a volt meter or plug something in). Unscrew the cover plate and add outlet shims until the outlet is flush with the wall.</span></p> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Broken Light Switch</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Turn off the circuit breaker (the light will go out when you choose the right one). Use a flathead screwdriver to remove the faceplate and a Phillips head to remove the light switch. Test the two wires connected to the screw for electricity. If it’s safe, disconnect and reassemble the light switch.</span></p> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Simple Short Circuit</strong><br /> Some electrical appliances, such as hairdryers, can frequently trip or short circuits. Reset the breaker. Repeated occurrences with the same appliance indicate it’s the appliance – not the electrical system. Without the appliance? A short in the wiring or receptacle needs to be addressed by a pro.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Cut or Damaged Extension Cord</strong><br /> Unplug both ends. Cut off the old plug. Gently score and peel back the insulation jacket. Strip each wire with a wire stripper, twisting each wire tightly at the end. Screw them into the back of the plug: black to gold; white to the silver screw; green to the green screw. Then close the plug and secure the wires. Cut in the middle? Purchase extra ends and turn the damaged cord into two new ones.</p> <h4><strong>Hazardous</strong></h4> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Flickering or Dimming Lights</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">This could be a sign of a poor connection and can lead to eventual arcing – loose/corroded connections making intermittent contact that could result in sparking, overheating, and fire.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Light Bulbs Burn Out Frequently</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">If you’re experience frequent bulb blowouts, it could be more serious than overuse. You may have a loose connection in the socket or circuit. Recessed lights that frequently fail? Nearby insulation could be causing overheating and these fixtures are designed to shut off to prevent fire.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Dead Outlets</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Dead outlets can result from a tripped poor connection (and possible arcing), or a tripped breaker due to excessive heat buildup resulting in melted wires or outlets.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Warm Outlets or Switches</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Unless it is a dimming switch, warm outlets are as a serious safety concern and should be addressed by a pro immediately.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Frequently Tripping Breakers</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Usually a sign the circuit is overloaded and using too much electricity. You should add a circuit or consider upgrading your electrical service.</span></p> <h3><strong>Electrical problems have you in over your head?</strong></h3> <p>Don’t be a DIY daredevil. Dealing with electrical is not like dealing with dry wall - electrical problems can bite! And while drywall can be cheaply and easily replaced, you cannot. If you don’t have the tools or expertise necessary to tackle these common electrical problems, Mr. Electric<sup>?</sup> can help. Don’t ignore potential dangers. <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Contact <em>Mr. Electric</em></a> for help today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/common-electrical-problems" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 14 May 2015 19:30:09 +0000 Super User 5874 at http://www.33pulse.com Outdoor Outlets and Electrical Safety http://www.33pulse.com/blog/outdoor-outlets-and-electrical-safety <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Outdoor Outlets and Electrical Safety</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-outdoor-outlets-and-electrical-safety.jpg?itok=a5Yz6AFE" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-outdoor-outlets-and-electrical-safety.jpg?itok=a5Yz6AFE" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Super User</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 1:30pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Warm weather and clear skies means it is finally barbeque season once again! May is National Barbeque Month, and we are definitely in the festive spirit. But before you get ready to fire up the grill and bust out the pool rafts, make <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-safety-services">electrical safety</a> a priority. It might be time for an outdoor outlet upgrade to keep your parties running smoothly this summer.</p> <p>So just what do you need when it comes to outdoor electrical outlets? Make certain to have <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/gfci-outlets">ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs)</a> installed outdoors for your outlets to protect from serious electrical problems. It’s also always a good idea to have additional outlets installed if possible, especially if find yourself running extension cords across your deck that have become a safety hazard.</p> <p>Don’t overlook the manual warning of certain appliances that say “not for outdoor use.” It’s always safer to double-check before running into a problem later on. Make sure that electrical appliances are unplugged and turned off when not in use or left unattended.</p> <p>Just like your outlets and appliances, extension cords need to be rated for outdoor use when you are using them in your backyard. If you must have extension cords running across your backyard during a barbeque, make sure to keep it out of the walkway and away from where children will be playing.</p> <p>If a rainstorm begins while you’re working as a master chef outside on your electric grill, don’t be a hero for the burgers. Stay safe and head into the kitchen with a backup plan to avoid the risk of electric shock.</p> <p>Don’t kick off barbeque season without getting pools and spas inspected by an electrician who can make sure you’re backyard is safe and ready for the summer. This is also a good time to make sure you know where electrical circuits and breakers are in case of an emergency.</p> <p>If you need any help making your backyard barbeque-ready, our professionals can make your <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">electrical renovations and fix-ups</a> a breeze.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/outdoor-outlets-and-electrical-safety" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 14 May 2015 18:30:58 +0000 Super User 5873 at http://www.33pulse.com 6 Types Of Electrical Outlet Upgrades http://www.33pulse.com/blog/6-types-of-electrical-outlet-upgrades <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>6 Types Of Electrical Outlet Upgrades</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-typesofoutletupgrades.jpg?itok=U9Krpp2p" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-typesofoutletupgrades.jpg?itok=U9Krpp2p" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 2:26pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div class="row"> <div class="message col-md-12"> <div class="col-md-5" data-align="left"><a href="http://www.www.33pulse.com/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-typesoutletsinfographic_0.jpg" target="_blank"><picture data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive"><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-typesoutletsinfographic_0.jpg?itok=bejGi8Fy 1x" media="(min-width: 1200px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-md/public/mre-typesoutletsinfographic_0.jpg?itok=Sz3mirRl 1x" media="(min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-sm/public/mre-typesoutletsinfographic_0.jpg?itok=aOXGrysq 1x" media="(min-width: 768px) and (max-width: 991px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-xs/public/mre-typesoutletsinfographic_0.jpg?itok=E_rQagnO 1x" media="(max-width: 767px)"></source><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><!--[if lt IE 9]> <img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-typesoutletsinfographic_0.jpg?itok=bejGi8Fy" alt="6 Types of Electrical Outlet Upgrades" title="" /> <![endif]--><!--[if !lt IE 9]><!--><img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-typesoutletsinfographic_0.jpg?itok=bejGi8Fy 1140w" alt="6 Types of Electrical Outlet Upgrades" title="" /><!-- <![endif]--></picture></a></div> <p>Is your home in need of some electrical outlet upgrades? Mr. Electric has the inside scoop with the 6 most common types of upgrades. Take a look below or you can click on our infographic at <span style="color: red;">left</span> to learn more!</p> <h3>LED Night Lights</h3> <p>LED night lights give you longer light with more available plugs. Leaving you available outlets, LED outlets also save you money with a 20-year life expectancy. Your children can sleep with more ease at night with their LED night-lights while you are keeping more money in your pocket.</p> <h3>USB Outlets</h3> <p>USB outlets are becoming the standard for homes. Instead of dealing with bulky chargers and adapters, you can plug your electronics directly into the outlet. While charging your mobile devices, you also have access to outlets for other uses. It's convenience for less than you might think.</p> <h3>Recessed Outlets</h3> <p>Unlike standard outlets that leave plugs dangling from the receptacle, recessed outlets are set deeper into the wall, preventing plugs form extending beyond the surface.</p> <h3>AFCI (Arc-Fault Circuit Interruptors)</h3> <p>When something unexpected happens causing wiring to overheat, an AFCI is necessary to detect the occurrence and shut down the outlet before damage can occur. These outlets can be easily incorporated into your main service panel and are a must have for protection from any sudden overheating.</p> <h3><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/specialty-outlets">TRR (Tamper Resistant Receptacles)</a></h3> <p>Tamper resistant receptacles are a must have for every home. These specialized outlets feature a barrier to prevent small children form inserting any foreign objects in them. This allows you to rest easy knowing there is no risks of any injuries caused by electrical shock or burns.</p> <h3>GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters)</h3> <p>This type of outlet upgrade helps to protect you and your family form potential electrical hazards. A GFCI constantly monitors electricity flowing in a circuit and if an interruption is detected, quickly shuts off power to that circuit. Easy and inexpensive installation makes this upgrade a no-brainer for your home.</p> <p>Still have questions? No problem! Contact <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Mr. Electric</a> today to learn more about these and other upgrades you can make to your home!</p> </div> </div> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/6-types-of-electrical-outlet-upgrades" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Wed, 29 Apr 2015 19:26:35 +0000 Brad Roop 5701 at http://www.33pulse.com Why It's Important To Get Rid of Two-Prong Outlets http://www.33pulse.com/blog/is-your-home-equipped-to-handle-the-growth-of-technology <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Why It&#039;s Important To Get Rid of Two-Prong Outlets</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicgrowthoftechnology_1.jpg?itok=mVacrtVE" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicgrowthoftechnology_1.jpg?itok=mVacrtVE" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Tuesday, April 28, 2015 - 10:22am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><strong>By: Jason Lee</strong></p> <p>Ever look at old family photos? You remember, the faded picture with the brown couch, wood panel walls and yellow(ish) shag carpet. Most people look at the photo and see these things and the smiling faces of the family. We look at these photos and are taken back to a time when another generation set the rules.</p> <p>But looking a little more closely at the photo of years gone by, you might notice something that is still around the old house and room today. Hidden in the photo, but still prominent in the room where the photo was taken, is that old, painted over two prong outlet. You know the one. It had the gaudy horse-carved table lamp plugged into it. At one time it was white but it was painted to match the wall color when the paneling came down and the sheet rock went up. You changed the entire look and feel of the living room over the years but that outlet stayed the same. And, why not? It only served one function and how often does technology change, right?</p> <p>The two prong outlets had been the norm for so long and years of remodeling and redecorating never seemed to affect the outlets. No upgrades were required. Just slap a new cover on it and it was good to go. When “new technology” came about, we were ready with the “cheater” outlet that still enabled us to use three prong electronics with the old two prong outlets.</p> <p>But soon everything seemed to require three prong outlets and that left us having an abundance of those grey three-to-two prong adaptors in our junk drawer.</p> <p>Old photos are great to look at and reminisce about past times. But, we are constantly changing and our technology is expanding at a rapid rate. Modern times call for modern outlets. Two prong outlets had a good run and they served a valuable purpose, but there comes a day when the grandfather, who led the head of the family for years, has to retire and give way to change and a new way of doing things.</p> <p>Outlet changes should be made because today’s outlets give us piece of mind, safety and convenience. Safety has been a top priority for new outlet designs. All modern homes, those built after 2008, should have child-proof outlets installed.</p> <p>Today’s modern three prong outlets come with a variety of features for convenience and safety. Although the days of the two-prong outlet are numbered, <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-outlets">modern GFCI</a>, <a rhef="http://www.33pulse.com/child-proof-outlets">child-proof </a>and <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/specialty-outlets">combination outlets </a> will never forget their roots.</p> <div class="row"> <h3 style="text-align: center;">Other Related Blog Topics</h3> <div class="col-md-3"><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/childproofing-electrical-outlets-in-your-home"><picture data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive"><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-childproofingoutlets-blog.png?itok=cJduuOZq 1x" media="(min-width: 1200px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-md/public/mre-childproofingoutlets-blog.png?itok=HZUNMdzE 1x" media="(min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-sm/public/mre-childproofingoutlets-blog.png?itok=YFGAWont 1x" media="(min-width: 768px) and (max-width: 991px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-xs/public/mre-childproofingoutlets-blog.png?itok=FUP8GISP 1x" media="(max-width: 767px)"></source><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><!--[if lt IE 9]> <img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-childproofingoutlets-blog.png?itok=cJduuOZq" alt="Childproofing Electrical Outlets In Your Home" title="" /> <![endif]--><!--[if !lt IE 9]><!--><img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-childproofingoutlets-blog.png?itok=cJduuOZq 830w" alt="Childproofing Electrical Outlets In Your Home" title="" /><!-- <![endif]--></picture></a></div> <div class="col-md-3"><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/3-signs-telling-you-to-upgrade-your-outlets"><picture data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive"><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-3signsoutlets-blog.png?itok=b54hNFrU 1x" media="(min-width: 1200px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-md/public/mre-3signsoutlets-blog.png?itok=UwK3mVi4 1x" media="(min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)"></source><source 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Telling You To Upgrade Your Outlets" title="" /><!-- <![endif]--></picture></a></div> <div class="col-md-3"><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/home-renovations-with-outlet-upgrades"><picture data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive"><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-homerenooutlets-blog.png?itok=lBuh8GDJ 1x" media="(min-width: 1200px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-md/public/mre-homerenooutlets-blog.png?itok=O-Aeb1Gy 1x" media="(min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-sm/public/mre-homerenooutlets-blog.png?itok=TVh6urCQ 1x" media="(min-width: 768px) and (max-width: 991px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-xs/public/mre-homerenooutlets-blog.png?itok=uq-fYfSE 1x" media="(max-width: 767px)"></source><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><!--[if lt IE 9]> <img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-homerenooutlets-blog.png?itok=lBuh8GDJ" alt="Home Renovations With Outlet Upgrades" title="" /> <![endif]--><!--[if !lt IE 9]><!--><img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-homerenooutlets-blog.png?itok=lBuh8GDJ 830w" alt="Home Renovations With Outlet Upgrades" title="" /><!-- <![endif]--></picture></a></div> <div class="col-md-3"><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/what-you-need-to-know-about-afci-and-gfci-outlets"><picture data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive"><!--[if IE 9]><video style="display: none;"><![endif]--><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-afcigfcioutlets-blog.png?itok=Mwj0qMh5 1x" media="(min-width: 1200px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-md/public/mre-afcigfcioutlets-blog.png?itok=WLGLd2Fd 1x" media="(min-width: 992px) and (max-width: 1199px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-sm/public/mre-afcigfcioutlets-blog.png?itok=z061dRka 1x" media="(min-width: 768px) and (max-width: 991px)"></source><source data-srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-xs/public/mre-afcigfcioutlets-blog.png?itok=lRjVA7ZF 1x" media="(max-width: 767px)"></source><!--[if IE 9]></video><![endif]--><!--[if lt IE 9]> <img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-afcigfcioutlets-blog.png?itok=Mwj0qMh5" alt="What You Need to Know About AFCI and GFCI Outlets" title="" /> <![endif]--><!--[if !lt IE 9]><!--><img data-picture-mapping="full-0" data-picture-group="full-0" class="img-responsive lazyload" srcset="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-afcigfcioutlets-blog.png?itok=Mwj0qMh5 830w" alt="What You Need to Know About AFCI and GFCI Outlets" title="" /><!-- <![endif]--></picture></a></div> </div> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/is-your-home-equipped-to-handle-the-growth-of-technology" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Tue, 28 Apr 2015 15:22:24 +0000 Brad Roop 5698 at http://www.33pulse.com Is Your Home's Electrical Wiring In Need Of Updating http://www.33pulse.com/blog/is-your-homes-electrical-wiring-in-need-of-updating <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Is Your Home&#039;s Electrical Wiring In Need Of Updating</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-is-your-homes-electrical-wiring-in-need-of-updating.jpg?itok=ICtlrZvz" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-is-your-homes-electrical-wiring-in-need-of-updating.jpg?itok=ICtlrZvz" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Wednesday, April 15, 2015 - 8:18am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Your lights and appliances are working fine, so that means your wiring is too, right? Not so much. Seldom inspected after installation, the wiring in your home may need an update, especially if your home is more than 40 years old.</p> <h2>Why update wiring?</h2> <p>Installing sufficient wiring goes beyond safety. It also means enhancing your home’s functionality, reliability, and safety to keep up with today’s ever-increasing power needs. This applies not only to the installation of current electrical wiring, but wiring for your phone, Internet, cable, and more.</p> <h2>Waiting is a risk.</h2> <p>According to the NFPA (National Fire Prevention Association), faulty wiring is the leading cause for residential fires. The National Electric Code (NEC) <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-code-updates">updates electrical codes</a> and standards for outlets and wiring every three years. Their mission is to keep up with technology designed to keep your home and family safe. Has the wiring in your home gotten any attention since the 2014 NEC code updates? Chances are it’s been far longer than that. ??</p> <h2>Your home may be behind the times and in need of wiring updates if you have…</h2> <h3>Older wiring</h3> <p>Aluminum wiring used in the 60s and 70s, non-metallic wiring installed in the 40s and 50s, and knob and tube wiring in pre-1930s homes are well-known safety hazards, as are loose connections and frayed wires resulting from wear-and-tear. ?</p> <h3>Two pronged, ungrounded outlets</h3> <p>These are an enormous safety hazard – for you and your electronics. Without proper grounding, electrical excesses have nowhere to go but into your devices – or you – even if you have a <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/how-a-surge-protector-works">surge protector</a>. Reduce shock risks by rapidly addressing this sign of wiring that is way behind the times.</p> <h3>Missing GFCIs</h3> <p>Identified by the “TEST” and “RESET” buttons on receptacles, <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/what-you-need-to-know-about-afci-and-gfci-outlets">GFCIs</a> protect you from shock in high moisture areas. They are currently required in bathrooms, kitchens, laundry rooms, utility rooms, garages, spa/pool areas, unfinished crawlspaces/basements, and any areas outside of your home. If you are lacking these inexpensive, easy-to-install devices in any of these areas, you may be in for a shocking experience.</p> <h3>Missing AFCIs</h3> <p><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/what-you-need-to-know-about-afci-and-gfci-outlets">AFCIs</a> prevent fire by acting as a circuit breaker, which disconnects in the event of a potentially dangerous arc. They are required in bedrooms in all 50 states, though some states require them in all circuits throughout the home.</p> <h3>Outlets that are not childproof</h3> <p><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/child-proof-electrical-outlets">Childproof outlets</a> require equal pressure in all prongs simultaneously for electricity to flow. They cost pennies more than traditional outlets and are required in all newly built homes.</p> <h3>Not enough power</h3> <p>How many amps power your home? While 60 amps may have been sufficient in the past, today’s homes often need 100 to 200 amps to successfully operate the glut of large and technologically advanced appliances you use simultaneously, from mobile devices and flat screens to your refrigerator and air conditioner. Without an adequate power supply, you could end up damaging these sensitive items beyond repair.</p> <h3>Other behind-the-times, wiring problem signs also include:</h3> <ul><li>Tripped breakers</li> <li>Blown fuses</li> <li>Using extension cords or adapters to compensate for a lack of outlets</li> <li>Flickering or dimming lights with the operation of neighboring appliances</li> <li>Rodent damage</li> <li>Popping, crackling, or buzzing</li> <li>Hot or scorch marked outlets</li> <li>Burning smells or smoke</li> </ul><p>Protect your family and home, ensuring the smooth, efficient operation of all things electrical while boosting the value of your property. <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Contact Mr. Electric? </a> for an <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-safety-inspections">electrical safety and wiring inspection</a> today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/is-your-homes-electrical-wiring-in-need-of-updating" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Wed, 15 Apr 2015 13:18:37 +0000 Brad Roop 5598 at http://www.33pulse.com Home Renovations with Outlet Upgrades http://www.33pulse.com/blog/home-renovations-with-outlet-upgrades <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Home Renovations with Outlet Upgrades</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-home-renovations-with-outlet-upgrades-blog.jpg?itok=ooGP26ge" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-home-renovations-with-outlet-upgrades-blog.jpg?itok=ooGP26ge" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, April 9, 2015 - 2:47pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><strong>By: Maddie Ogletree</strong></p> <p>Your spring renovation isn’t complete without a functionality update for your <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-outlets">electrical outlets</a>. Standard outlets just won’t cut it anymore when it comes to powering your home and electronics. You’ll be surprised at how much a few simple upgrades can make your life more convenient.</p> <h3>USB Outlets</h3> <p>USB outlets are becoming a necessity for charging your phone, tablet and other electronic devices. It’s always an inconvenience to lose that little white iPhone adapter. But if your outlets are equipped for USBs, your life is a little bit easier. USB outlets are becoming the standard for homes. You can easily plug in your device while you’re in the kitchen, home office or bedroom with a USB upgrade.</p> <h3>Nightlight Outlets</h3> <p>Bulky, inconvenient nightlights aren’t your only option. New outlets like the SnapPower outlet feature a nightlight as part of their design. When you turn the lights out, the nightlight comes on, illuminating the outlet from below. No longer do you need to unplug the light to charge your computer. It’s a simple idea to add to your spring remodel!</p> <h3>Drawer and Cabinet Outlets</h3> <p>If you’re undertaking a bathroom renovation, adding an outlet inside of a drawer or cabinet is a way to conveniently power electric razors, hairdryers and more styling tools. If you add in a USB plug as well, you’ll keep your phone charging while you get ready to take on the day.</p> <h3>Charging Stations</h3> <p>This idea can also carry over to creating a charging station in your bedroom or living room. Install a couple of plugs in the back of a drawer and let your devices charge without the unsightly wires sprawling everywhere.</p> <h3><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/specialty-outlets">Recessed Outlets</a></h3> <p>Recessed outlets in the kitchen are becoming increasingly popular, and for good reason! Keep your kitchen surfaces free from wires until you need them by conveniently hiding those not-so-pretty plugs. There are a variety of pop out outlets that let you stylishly hide your outlets when you don’t need them.</p> <p>If you’re in need of a little help updating your outlets, we’d love to give you a hand with your spring renovations! Call Mr. Electric today to find out more.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/home-renovations-with-outlet-upgrades" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 09 Apr 2015 19:47:13 +0000 Brad Roop 5577 at http://www.33pulse.com

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