Mr. Electric - electrical safety http://www.33pulse.com/taxonomy/term/495 en 3 Signs Telling You to Upgrade Your Outlets http://www.33pulse.com/blog/3-signs-telling-you-to-upgrade-your-outlets <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>3 Signs Telling You to Upgrade Your Outlets</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-3-signs-telling-you-to-upgrade-your-outlets.jpg?itok=-ysbFw1g" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-3-signs-telling-you-to-upgrade-your-outlets.jpg?itok=-ysbFw1g" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 9:21am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Are you sporting the latest in mobile technology? Smartphones, tablets, and various mobile devices are all the rage these days, going out of date faster than the milk souring in your fridge. And while you’re likely spending a lot of money keeping up with them, it’s a good bet you haven’t bothered keeping up with the outlets that keep them powered for your convenience.</p> <h2><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-outlets">Are you missing these signs your outlets are behind the times? </a></h2> <h3>1. You never have to count higher than two.</h3> <h4 style="color: red;">The problem:</h4> <p>Besides preventing you from plugging in 3-prong appliances, ungrounded 2-prong outlets present a substantial safety risk: a risk of electrical shock to you, and a risk of frying your expensive electronics.</p> <h4>The solution:</h4> <p>Simply replacing that old 2-pronger for a 3-prong outlet will NOT solve the problem, but instead create an electrocution and appliance hazard. Rewiring the panel with a 3-wire circuit is crucial to providing the necessary ground. You may also consider<a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-outlets"> upgrading to a GFCI </a>, which is less expensive and prevents shock-related issues, but this solution will not provide the necessary ground to protect sensitive electronics.</p> <h4>We bet you didn’t know…</h4> <p>Without properly grounded outlets, surge protection is a no-go. Whether you buy a $10 surge protector or a $200 one, it offers no protection whatsoever to your appliances without adequate ground.</p> <h3>2. You recently had a hair-raising experience in the bathroom.</h3> <h4 style="color: red;">The problem:</h4> <p>GFCIs protect you from electrical shock in rooms with increased risks, such as those that could be exposed to water. GFCIs are identified by the “test” and “reset” buttons on receptacles. These devices save lives by immediately stopping the flow of current when it travels along an unintended path - such as into you. They are currently required for use with dishwashers, in baths, kitchens, laundries, garages/utility rooms, crawl spaces, unfinished basements, spa/pool areas, and home exteriors.</p> <h4>The solution:</h4> <p>Upgrade to GFCI outlets. It’s not worth putting your family at risk to postpone this upgrade. Fear not if your home is older. GFCIs work with or without grounding, and are easy and inexpensive to install.</p> <h4>We bet you didn’t know…</h4> <p>The CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission) estimates the installation of GFCIs in household branch circuits could prevent more than 200 electrocutions and thousands of electrical shocks and burns in and around the home annually.</p> <h3>3. The mixture of small children and electrical outlets in your house scares you.</h3> <h4 style="color: red;">The problem:</h4> <p>It’s not the mess, the whining, or the drooling, it’s those childproof outlets your home is missing. In older outlets, all a child has to do is stick an object in a single prong to suffer electrical injury. Whether children live with you or only come for the occasional visit, childproof outlets offer inexpensive, effective protection against dangerous electrical shocks and burns resulting from tampering.</p> <h4>The solution:</h4> <p>Adding <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/child-proof-outlets">childproof outlets </a> is a simple and inexpensive child protection solution. Childproof outlets require the use of equal pressure in all prongs of the outlet simultaneously in order to allow for the flow of electricity. They are just as easy to use as traditional plugs for adults, yet still provide essential protection for children. Upgrading to childproof outlets is simple, permanent, and inexpensive, mere pennies more than traditional receptacles. They are so effective that they are now required in all newly built homes.</p> <h4>We bet you didn’t know…</h4> <p>Of the over 2,400 electrical shocks and burns resulting from children toying with outlets annually, 70 percent occur in the presence of adults.</p> <h3>What are you waiting for?</h3> <p>These outlet types are mandated in new homes today because unlike their predecessors, whose main function is merely to deliver electricity, these outlets save lives. Still not convinced? Consider the small cost of upgrading the outlets in your home to the enormous cost of dealing with any of the situations above. You might think your home safe, but is it?</p> <p>Upgrade your outlets – not your smartphone. They’ve been patient long enough. <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Contact Mr. Electric? </a> today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/3-signs-telling-you-to-upgrade-your-outlets" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Wed, 08 Apr 2015 14:21:26 +0000 Brad Roop 5574 at http://www.33pulse.com Fire Safety During Burn Awareness Week http://www.33pulse.com/blog/fire-safety-during-burn-awareness-week <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Fire Safety During Burn Awareness Week</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-burn_awareness_week.jpg?itok=pDwbSd9E" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3133" height="1571" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-burn_awareness_week.jpg?itok=pDwbSd9E" width="3133" height="1571" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Super User</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Monday, February 2, 2015 - 9:19am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Most burn injuries are preventable. That’s why in honor of National Burn Awareness Week, February 1-7, 2015, organizations across the U.S. are coming together to kick-off a yearlong campaign aimed at preventing burns in our communities. Do you have the fire safety information you need to protect your family from necessary burns and your home from electrical fire?</p> <h2>Shocking Home Electrical Fire Statistics</h2> <ul><li>79 percent of home electrical fires spread beyond their point of origin.</li> <li>39 percent of home electrical fires involve lighting and electrical distribution and power transfer equipment (electrical panels, circuit breakers, transfer switches, disconnects, etc.)</li> <li>Home electrical fires result in an estimated 280 deaths annually.</li> <li>Fire departments across the U.S. respond to an estimated 25,900 home electrical fires every year, treating over 1,000 burn-related injuries.</li> <li>Each year, electrical fires cause over a billion dollars in property loss, which average a far greater dollar loss per fire than those that are non-electrical.</li> </ul><h2>Protect Your Home and Family with These Electrical Fire Safety Tips:</h2> <ul><li>Don’t overload outlets.</li> <li>Never utilize extension cords as a permanent wiring solution. Have an outlet added and utilize certified surge protectors and power strips.</li> <li>Use the correct wattage light bulb in every fixture.</li> <li>Replace electrical wires that show signs of wear-and-tear. This includes electrical devices.</li> <li>Use extreme caution when operating appliances near water.</li> <li>Keep flammable items away from heat sources.</li> <li>Ensure your dryer and all venting is lint-free.</li> <li>Have your home electrical inspected every 10 years at a minimum.</li> </ul><h2>If You Have Children, Follow These Electrical Fire Safety Tips:</h2> <p>Note:?Children are at an increased risk for electrical burns due to their ignorance and curiosity.?</p> <ul><li>Use covers on every electrical outlet.</li> <li>Teach children never to touch electrical outlets or play with cords.</li> <li>Keep electrical cords and appliances out of reach of children. Unplug those that are.</li> <li>Teach older children the dangers of operating electrical devices near wet areas.</li> <li>Upgrade to child safe outlets throughout your home.</li> <li>Install GFCIs in every outlet near a water source.</li> </ul><h2>If You Have Any of the following Fire Safety Issues, Contact a Qualified Mr. Electric<sup>?</sup> Professional Immediately:</h2> <ul><li>Fuses or circuit breakers that repeatedly blow or trip.</li> <li>Flickering lights.</li> <li>Outlets or switches that are warm or hot to the touch.</li> <li>Cracked or broken wall outlets.</li> <li>Outlets that emit sparks.</li> <li>Burning rubber type odors emanating from appliances.</li> </ul><p>Fire safety starts with you! Spread the word and get the information you need to keep your family and your home safe from electrical fire risks with help from?Mr. Electric. Ensure safety by scheduling your free electrical home inspection today.</p> <p>?</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/fire-safety-during-burn-awareness-week" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Mon, 02 Feb 2015 15:19:33 +0000 Super User 5494 at http://www.33pulse.com Power Surge Protection This Winter http://www.33pulse.com/blog/power-surge-protection-this-winter <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Power Surge Protection This Winter</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code_-_mre_-_power_surge_protection_this_winter_season.jpg?itok=QFdR13Um" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code_-_mre_-_power_surge_protection_this_winter_season.jpg?itok=QFdR13Um" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Super User</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Tuesday, January 20, 2015 - 10:20am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Is your sensitive electronic equipment protected from the potentially devastating effects a power surge brought on by winter weather? Seventy percent of U.S. power outages are attributable to severe weather, with winter months producing a host of storms that can result in outages and subsequent surges. Power surges are now more troublesome than ever, as homeowners now own a much wider array of this sophisticated and expensive electronic equipment.</p> <h2>How does a winter power surge happen?</h2> <ul><li>Sudden spikes and drops in power from use and repairs.</li> <li>Arcing from damaged power lines.</li> <li>Electrical repairs to power lines and poles downed by ice and falling trees, causing a power surge into the grid.</li> <li>Strong winds from winter storms causing wires to come into contact with one another.</li> <li>Rolling blackouts due to increases in heat consumption.</li> <li>Trees branches or animals conducting energy between live wires.</li> </ul><h2>Surge Suppressor Safety</h2> <p>A surge protector offers your sensitive electronics protection in the event of power surge or spike. Those looking for additional support may want to consider an?uninterruptable?power supply (UPS) as well, which offers surge protection plus the added benefit of a battery backup, allowing for the safe shutdown of equipment and prevention of data loss in the event of an outage.</p> <h2>Types of Surge Protectors</h2> <p>Multiple layers of surge protection coverage are required for complete protection. Even whole house surge protectors cannot handle 100 percent of surges. While all three levels are recommended, the combination of Type 2 and 3 devices will provide an adequate safeguard, however.</p> <ul><li>Type 1:<br /> Whole house protection between street power lines and your home.</li> <li>Type 2:<br /> Whole house protection between the meter and breaker box.</li> <li>Type 3?:<br /> Point-of-use protection at wall outlets in your home.</li> </ul><h2>Only as Good as Your Grounding</h2> <p>Without a properly grounded home and outlets, even the best surge protector will fail to protect your home. Why? Surge protectors shed all that excess voltage through ground. Have your home inspected for grounding issues prior to installation to ensure effective surge protection and prevent the need for replacing expensive electronics due to failure.</p> <h2>A Sobering Look at the Numbers</h2> <p>Adding surge protection to your home costs very little in comparison to the replacement cost of your electronics. Protection at outlets runs as little as $10, while whole house protections costs a few hundred. Sound like a lot? The cost of replacing a single large home appliance such as a washer, dryer, stove, or hot water heater will likely cost you double the investment in a surge protector. Start adding in iPhones, tablets, e-readers, laptops or other devices in your home that could be destroyed by a surge while charging and the numbers are nauseating. This is why the average insurance claim for power surge and lighting related damage is over $4,000, not to mention the inconvenience of living without those electronics until replacements are procured, making the costs of installing a surge protector a drop in the bucket.</p> <p>Can you afford to live without surge protection? Trust in Mr. Electric<sup>?</sup> to keep your electronic essentials from getting zapped. Our professionals have the information you need to help you select the best surge protection for your home or business.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/power-surge-protection-this-winter" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Tue, 20 Jan 2015 16:20:53 +0000 Super User 5474 at http://www.33pulse.com Shedding Light on Electric Candles http://www.33pulse.com/blog/shedding-light-on-electric-candles <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Shedding Light on Electric Candles</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicelectriccandles.jpg?itok=uHBUonZc" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicelectriccandles.jpg?itok=uHBUonZc" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Beth Farrell</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Tuesday, December 9, 2014 - 9:50am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div> <p>By Hannah Haseloff</p> <p>Candles can be a homeowner’s best friend, especially around the holidays. They can add style to a room, create mood lighting, and make a house smell delicious.? They are also useful to have during those emergency power outages and can help you find your way in the dark. ?With the introduction of electric candles, candles are increasing in popularity. But what is the difference? Are electric candles safer than traditional ones? Which is better? Maybe our guide to electric candles can help you to decide for yourself!</p> <h2>Safety</h2> <p>One drawback to traditional candles is the fire hazard that comes with having an open flame. Knocking over a candle or placing flammable objects too close can have disastrous effects. Between 2007 and 2011, there were over 10,630 started by candles in the home. Although electric candles present much less of a fire hazard, they can still be dangerous. Small children can easily remove the button sized batteries from the candles and swallow them. It is a good idea to tape over the battery access panel and keep the candles out of reach.</p> <h2>Lighting</h2> <p>Candles are great for setting mood lighting and traditional ceremonies. In an emergency, candles can be used as a source of light. Traditional candles produce more light than electric ones; however, electric candles still provide a good source of light.</p> <h2>Calming Effect</h2> <p>Both electric and traditional candles can be used as a calming agent using aromatherapy.</p> <h2>Timer</h2> <p>Electric candles can be placed on a timer and can be set to turn on automatically.</p> <h2>No Melting</h2> <p>One nice thing about electric candles is that they won’t melt or ever lose their shape. Traditional candles can create a mess when they melt or be rendered useless because of their distorted shape.</p> <h2>Fragrance</h2> <p>Electric candles not only have a variety of fragrances, but can also serve as an insect repellent. For people who love candles, but do not love the scent, unscented electric candles are also available.</p> <h2>Style</h2> <p>One advantage of electric candles is that they come in more variety than traditional candles. Another advantage is that electric candles be placed in areas were traditional candles could not because of the fire hazard. For more candle styling tips, visit <a href="https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=candles&amp;term_meta%5B%5D=candles">My Home Life Magazine Pinterest board</a>.</p> <p>Source: <a href="http://flamelesscandles.com/FAQs">http://flamelesscandles.com/FAQs</a></p> </div> <p>?</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/shedding-light-on-electric-candles" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Tue, 09 Dec 2014 15:50:19 +0000 Mary Beth Farrell 5419 at http://www.33pulse.com Plugging Into Safety with Mr. Electric http://www.33pulse.com/blog/plugging-into-safety-with-mr-electric <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Plugging Into Safety with Mr. Electric</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicchild.jpg?itok=idf6VZn5" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicchild.jpg?itok=idf6VZn5" width="1529" height="748" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Beth Farrell</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Monday, September 29, 2014 - 4:10pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>By Hannah Haseloff</p> <p>Electricity is a wonderful invention that makes our lives infinitely easier, but electricity can also be very dangerous if proper precautions are not practiced. Did you know that 70 percent of child-related electrical accidents happen in the home while under adult supervision? In accordance with National Childhood Injury Prevention Month, Mr. Electric? has some tips to help you keep your children safe.</p> <p><strong>Batteries</strong></p> <p>Thousands of children are hospitalized every year due to swallowing batteries. Children are especially attracted to the small button type. Store batteries in proper containers inside a locked cabinet, and always monitor children with electronic play toy use.</p> <p><strong>Christmas Trees</strong></p> <p>Each year numerous children are injured and electrocuted by playing with Christmas tree cords. Putting up a baby gate or a small piece of furniture in front of an outlet or tree can keep small children away from danger. Never leave the Christmas tree lights on when you are not home. This applies to the lights on both real and artificial trees.</p> <p><strong>Cords</strong></p> <p>Small children can easily pull heavy or hot appliances on top of themselves if the cords are not kept out of reach. Use command hooks or cord ties to keep long cords away from little hands.</p> <p><strong>Electrical Sockets</strong></p> <p>Cover all electrical sockets with socket covers to prevent children from sticking objects into them. Make sure the covers are not so small the child could choke on them or easily pull them out. Also check your installation, as faulty installation can cause a fire.</p> <p><strong>Hair Appliances</strong></p> <p>Curling irons, blow dryers, straighteners can cause burns and even fires if left turned on unattended. Young girls blow drying, straightening or curling their hair can get serious burns, so teach them to be cautious when using these appliances, and be sure to follow your own advice as well.</p> <p><strong>Irons</strong></p> <p>Never leave an iron on unattended, as this presents both a fire and safety hazard. Each year, children are severely burned from irons left turned on and left unattended. Do not leave an iron on a piece of clothing for too long, as this also presents the risk of causing a fire.</p> <p><strong>Ovens</strong></p> <p>Teach children to stay away from the oven and other hot appliances in the kitchen. Never leave the oven door open when it is turned on so those wandering hands don’t wind up inside the hot space.</p> <p><strong>Plugs</strong></p> <p>Never leave appliances such as cell phones and computer cords plugged in. Small children could easily put the end of the cord in their month and get electrocuted.</p> <p><strong>Smoke Alarms</strong></p> <p>A smoke alarm is your first warning in case of fire, so it should be properly maintained. Change smoke alarm batteries at least once a year, and check your smoke alarm once a month to make sure it is working. Teach young children what the alarm means. Have an evacuation plan in case of fire, and run drills with your family.</p> <p>Practice proper electrical etiquette by teaching older children hoe to use appliances and properly plug and unplug electric devices. Use only one power strip per outlet to avoid overusing and overheating your electrical outlets. Always keep cloth and other flammable products away from your electrical outlets, as they can present a fire hazard, and keep electrical appliances away from water.</p> <p>Keep in mind that small children are not the only ones at risk of electricity-related injuries. While children 14 and under are at the greatest risk, even adults can accidently electrocute themselves. Visit <a href="http://www.esfi.org/index.cfm/page/Injury-and-Fatality-Statistics/pid/12015">Electrical Safety Foundation International’s website</a> or <a href="http://www.safekids.org/safetytips">Safe Kids.org</a> for additional electrical safety tips for you and your family.?</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/plugging-into-safety-with-mr-electric" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Mon, 29 Sep 2014 21:10:35 +0000 Mary Beth Farrell 5185 at http://www.33pulse.com Electrical Safety Month: Tips for a Safer Home http://www.33pulse.com/blog/electrical-safety-month-tips-for-a-safer-home <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Electrical Safety Month: Tips for a Safer Home </h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicsafety.jpg?itok=TB236CHM" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="Electrical Safety Month" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me-bloggraphicsafety.jpg?itok=TB236CHM" width="3058" height="1496" alt="Electrical Safety Month" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Super User</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 2:58pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>According to <a href="http://www.esfi.org/">The Electrical Safety Foundation International</a>, electrical incidents cause 43,900 home fires, 438 deaths, 1,430 injuries and result in $1.47 billion in property damage each year. May is National Electrical Safety Month and helps promote safety education and awareness to reduce the number of electrical related accidents. In honor of Electrical Safety Month, Mr. Electric? has complied a list of simple tips for a safer home.</p> <ul><li>Always replace damaged or loose electrical cords.</li> <li>Avoid running extension cords across doorways or under carpets.</li> <li>Never yank an electrical cord from the wall.</li> <li>Replace wobbly switches and outlets.</li> <li>Consider adding additional circuits or outlets by a Mr. Electric electrician in order to avoid the use of extension cords.</li> <li>Avoid overloading outlets and never uses extension cords as permanent outlets.</li> <li>If outlets or switches feel warm and you’re having problems with blowing fuses, tripped circuits or flickering lights, call your local Mr. Electric.</li> <li>Be sure to place lamps on level surfaces and away from things that can burn.</li> <li>Never place anything that burns near a furnace, water heater, space heater, or stove.</li> <li>Only use bulbs that match electronics recommended wattage.</li> <li>Never use electrical equipment near water.</li> <li>Remember to unplug outlets when not in use.</li> <li>For households with small children, place safety caps along all unused outlets.</li> <li>Teach children not to touch electrical outlets or appliances (especially with wet hands), whether they're on or off.</li> <li>Educate children on the dangers of “green boxes” (substations and transformers) and not to play on them.</li> </ul></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/electrical-safety-month-tips-for-a-safer-home" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Wed, 30 Apr 2014 19:58:36 +0000 Super User 4289 at http://www.33pulse.com

青苹果影院y04080