Mr. Electric - Electronics http://www.33pulse.com/taxonomy/term/7 en Get Organized and Label Your Electrical Panel http://www.33pulse.com/blog/get-organized-and-label-your-electrical-panel <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Get Organized and Label Your Electrical Panel</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-label-electrical-panel-0419.jpg?itok=NLQ3JFZI" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="825" height="400" alt="Knowing which areas of your home are serviced by which circuit breaker is crucial in case of an emergency. You never know when you might need to shut off the power." /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-label-electrical-panel-0419.jpg?itok=NLQ3JFZI" width="825" height="400" alt="Knowing which areas of your home are serviced by which circuit breaker is crucial in case of an emergency. You never know when you might need to shut off the power." /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Scroggins</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 12:00am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Labeling your electrical panel can save time and confusion. You’ll be able to confidently control any area of your home or business with just the flip of a switch. Here are some tips from <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/waco">Mr. Electric</a> to make this process simple and safe!</p> <p>Knowing which areas of your home are serviced by which circuit breaker is crucial in case of an emergency. You never know when you might need to shut off the power.</p> <p>?</p> <ul><li>Take on the labeling project with a partner. Designate one person to flip the switches in each area, while the other is at the panel testing it. This is the most efficient process.</li> <li>Buy some blank sticky labels to apply on each switch. It’s easier than taping individual papers.</li> <li>First turn off every circuit in your home. Then turn on each one individually to note which light fixture turned on. Label the electrical panel accordingly.</li> <li>Some sections of the electrical panel may not belong to one specific breaker. If this is the case, improper wiring could be the issue. Give <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/waco">Mr. Electric</a> a call if this happens!</li> <li>Clothes dryers and washing machines, water heaters and ovens often require multiple breakers due to the high amount of power required to operate. Don’t be confused if this happens!</li> <li>If you don’t want to write out the labels, numbering them is also a common system. It just depends on preference and what’s easiest for you.</li> </ul><p>?</p> <p>For more information about electrical panels, check out a previous blog from <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/read-electrical-panel">Mr. Electric</a>!</p> <p>This process can be time consuming and a bit frustrating at times, but it will be worth it in the end! For any other questions regarding this process, or you’re dealing with other electrical issues, contact your local <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/">Mr. Electric</a> today!</p> <p>?</p> <p>?</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/get-organized-and-label-your-electrical-panel" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 +0000 Mary Scroggins 6611 at http://www.33pulse.com Never Do This When Using an Electric Blanket http://www.33pulse.com/blog/electric-blanket-safety <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Never Do This When Using an Electric Blanket</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-electric-blanket-safety-0319.jpg?itok=N5NUISwA" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="824" height="400" alt="Never wash your electric blanket and other rules for safe electric blanket use this winter." /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-blog-electric-blanket-safety-0319.jpg?itok=N5NUISwA" width="824" height="400" alt="Never wash your electric blanket and other rules for safe electric blanket use this winter." /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Kimberly Denman</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Monday, October 19, 2015 - 10:33pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Now that cooler weather has arrived, you can revel in warm sweaters, cozy socks and comfy blankets. Is your new electric blanket safe to use? ?Follow these simple safety guidelines to ensure your electric blanket doesn’t create a fire hazard.</p> <h4><strong>DO</strong></h4> <ul><li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Choose an electric blanket that conforms to Underwriters Laboratories (UL) standards. This safety certification organization has been testing products and establishing standards for over 100 years.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Lay the heated area of the electric blanket flat rather than folded or balled up so the heat doesn’t become too intense.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Place the blanket on top of you, not under you, to prevent damaging the blanket’s internal coils. Keep other items such as books, pillows and stuffed animals off of the blanket so heat has a way to escape.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Keep pets away from electric blankets, especially while in use. A sharp claw or tooth could puncture the cord insulation or damage the wires.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Turn off the electric blanket when no one is using it. Most models have no internal temperature control, so they will not automatically turn off if they overheat.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Loosely wrap the control cords around the blanket when folding it up for storage.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Turn off and unplug the electric blanket immediately if you see smoke or smell something burning. Blanket discoloration could indicate melting or burning internal elements.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Call the manufacturer for advice if your electric blanket starts operating improperly, such as if one area of the blanket becomes overheated or you see a scorch mark on the blanket. If you can’t resolve the improper operation, discontinue using the product.</li> </ul><h4><strong>DON’T</strong></h4> <ul><li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t use electric blankets on infants or toddlers, people with disabilities, or anyone who can’t operate the heating controls themselves.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don't use an electric blanket all night unless it is specifically rated for safe overnight use.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t run the power cord between the mattress and the box spring when using the electric blanket in bed. This could damage or heat up the cord and potentially cause a fire.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t twist or pinch the control cords since this could damage them. This is also means you shouldn’t use electric blankets with adjustable hospital beds, sofa sleepers, or Murphy beds where the cords could become pinched in the bed-folding mechanisms.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t use an electric blanket on a waterbed.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t use an electric blanket and a heated mattress pad at the same time. The combined warmth could cause overheating and possibly start a fire.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t wash your electric blanket. The twisting and tugging motions of a washing machine are almost certain to damage the internal coils.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t iron your electric blanket. This could melt the cord insulation.</li> <li style="margin-left: 0.5in;">Don’t dry clean your electric blanket. Solvents used in dry cleaning could damage the cord insulation.</li> </ul><p>It may seem like using an electric blanket comes with many do’s and don’ts, but most of them are fairly common sense. Use your electric blanket safely and you’ll enjoy added warmth and coziness this winter.</p> <p>For help with other electrical issues in your home, please contact <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Mr. Electric?</a> today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/electric-blanket-safety" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Tue, 20 Oct 2015 03:33:04 +0000 Kimberly Denman 6272 at http://www.33pulse.com The Evolution of Flash Photography http://www.33pulse.com/blog/the-evolution-of-flash-photography <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>The Evolution of Flash Photography</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-evolution-of-flash-photography.jpg?itok=VFpOJkFR" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-evolution-of-flash-photography.jpg?itok=VFpOJkFR" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Beth Farrell</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Wednesday, June 17, 2015 - 1:05pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">By Spencer Cutright</span></p> <p>Let’s face it: no summer vacation is complete without plenty of pictures. With the invention of the “selfie stick” and apps like Instagram and Snapchat, taking pictures has never been so user friendly, and photography has never been more prevalent than it is today.</p> <p>However, this would not be possible if flash photography had never been invented. It’s hard to believe, but flash wasn’t always as common or safe as it is today. Here is a brief look at the history of flash photography.</p> <h2>Flash Lamp</h2> <p>Flash photography originally began as an unsafe and incredibly intricate device known as the flash lamp, which was invented in 1899. Photographers would fill a pan with flash powder, which was then ignited, leading to a small explosion that produced a quick flash. The flash lamp is known for being very unsafe, and many photographers who used it were either killed or injured in the process.</p> <h2>Flash Bulbs</h2> <p>Around the 1930s, flash bulbs replaced flash powder. Oxygen-filled bulbs were electricity ignited, producing a quick bright flash. However, the bulbs could only be used once, and they were often too hot to handle right after the flash.</p> <h2>Electronic Flash</h2> <p>Thirty years after the flash bulb, the cheaper and more efficient electronic flash was invented. Electronic flashers are often attached to a camera and produce an instantaneous and very bright flash through a flash tube when a picture is taken.</p> <h2>LED Flash</h2> <p>Found on camera phones as early as 2000, LED flash uses high current LEDs to produce a quick flash when a picture is taken. LED flash makes flash photography efficient and miniaturized.</p> <p>So next time you pull out our camera or smartphone to capture a special moment this summer, keep in mind all the inventors who made modern photography possible.? The future of photography is certainly bright with many possibilities ahead.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/the-evolution-of-flash-photography" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Wed, 17 Jun 2015 18:05:42 +0000 Mary Beth Farrell 5920 at http://www.33pulse.com Get To Know Your Leviton Thermostat http://www.33pulse.com/blog/get-to-know-your-leviton-thermostat <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Get To Know Your Leviton Thermostat</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/freelance-blog-get-to-know-your-leviton-thermostat.jpg?itok=vtHj5uGy" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/freelance-blog-get-to-know-your-leviton-thermostat.jpg?itok=vtHj5uGy" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Beth Farrell</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Tuesday, June 16, 2015 - 4:46pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Those looking for the ultimate in programmable thermostat technology won’t go wrong with the latest generation of?Leviton?thermostats. Providing precise temperature control and an array of automation options, the?Omnistat2?programmable thermostat by?Leviton?rises far above the competition.</p> <h2>What makes a?Leviton?Omnistat2?thermostat unique?</h2> <p><strong>Broad Compatibility</strong><br /> Works with an array of energy sources: gas, oil, steam,?hydronic, forced air, radiant, electric, geothermal, and heat pumps. Perfect for existing residential, new construction, and small commercial retrofits, coming in white, black, and silver color options.</p> <ul><li><strong>Wired</strong><br /> Wired models boast simple controls and a large display, with special settings for extended periods of absence. They can provide temperature and humidity monitoring for multiple settings, including homes, offices, attics, basements/cellars, greenhouses, humidors, and more. Integrates seamlessly with?Leviton?security and automation systems as well.</li> <li><strong>Wireless</strong><br /> Dubbed the Omnistat2 ZigBee thermostat, these models offer the same functionality as wireless models, but with wireless communication capable of integrating with home automation. A great option for retrofits – simply swap out your existing thermostat and connect your devices wirelessly.</li> </ul><p><strong>Ease of Use</strong></p> <ul><li>Won’t lose settings or time with outages. No batteries required!</li> <li>7 day scheduling function – program a different option for every day of the week.</li> <li>Advanced digital technology allows the thermostat to learn your heating/cooling patterns, and then control your system for maximum efficiency and comfort.</li> <li>Motion sensitive screen illuminates when approached for quick adjustments – day or night!</li> <li>Easy temperature adjustment – just turn the scroll right or left.</li> <li>Automatically changes over from air to heat without the need to manually adjust settings.</li> <li>Periodic fan cycling for comfort.</li> <li>Built-in vacation mode that restores temperatures automatically.</li> </ul><p><strong>Functionality</strong></p> <ul><li>Full control via the built-in touchscreen or any mobile device.</li> <li>Displays outdoor temperatures, humidity settings, and energy usage.</li> <li>Allows for temperature averaging between indoor and outdoor locations and comparison between heat/cool set points.</li> <li>Filter change reminders.</li> <li>Simplified and advanced display options for further customization.</li> <li>And more…</li> </ul><p><strong>Home Automation Capabilities</strong></p> <ul><li>With wireless models, no additional wiring to the automation controller is necessary courtesy of wireless communication.</li> <li>Set it to control temperatures via events such as alarm system or motion activation.</li> <li>Use it to control individual high-draw devices such as signage, pool pumps, fountains, and other devices with motors/fans.</li> <li>Works with both Leviton and other manufacturer’s automation systems.</li> </ul><p>Feeling a little overwhelmed by today’s technology? Mr. Electric<sup>?</sup> can help. Simplify your life today with our help and the latest in home automation technology!</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/get-to-know-your-leviton-thermostat" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Tue, 16 Jun 2015 21:46:22 +0000 Mary Beth Farrell 5919 at http://www.33pulse.com Fun Electrical Experiments for Father’s Day http://www.33pulse.com/blog/fun-electrical-experiments-for-fathers-day <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Fun Electrical Experiments for Father’s Day</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-fun-electrical-experiments-for-fathers-day-ver2.jpg?itok=2zI2AhU_" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-fun-electrical-experiments-for-fathers-day-ver2.jpg?itok=2zI2AhU_" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Beth Farrell</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 9:43am</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>By: Sarah Trocolli</p> <p>Father of electricity Nikola Tesla was known for being brilliant, quirky and driven in his pursuits to understand electricity, and after many experiments, Tesla eventually laid the ground work for the modern day Alternating Current electric supply system. As a tribute to Tesla and all the dads around the world, Mr. Electric<sup>?</sup> presents a few kid-friendly experiments exploring the basics of electricity for a fun Father’s Day activity. The kids can explore electrons, static electricity, voltaic batteries and other simple components of electricity – all under the safe supervision of their dads.</p> <h2>Charging a Light Bulb</h2> <p><strong>Level of difficulty</strong>: Easy</p> <p><strong>What you need</strong>: A dark room, fluorescent light bulb and a comb or woolen scarf.</p> <p><strong>What to do</strong>: Run the comb through your hair or through the wool scarf at least 20 times to let the electrons build on the comb. Then turn out the lights and hold the comb to the bottom of your florescent light bulb and watch the electrons charge the bulb. This is great for learning about electrons, and it can be a fun magic trick! For further explanation, click <a href="http://www.lovemyscience.com/chargingupalightbulb.html">here</a>.</p> <h2>Electric Cornstarch</h2> <p><strong>Level of difficulty</strong>: Easy</p> <p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;"><strong>What you need</strong>: Cornstarch, vegetable oil, mixing bowl, large spoon, balloon, and a measuring cup.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;"><strong>What to do</strong>: Blow up the balloon, tie it and then rub it on your hair. Mix a fourth cup of cornstarch and a fourth cup of vegetable oil into a mixing bowl, and then put the mixture on a spoon. Hold the spoon with the mixture on it near the balloon and watch the mixture gravitate towards the balloon. This experiment looks like a gooey monster stretching to touch the balloon, and it is a fun way to learn about static electricity! For further explanation, click </span><a href="http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/electric-cornstarch" style="line-height: 1.6em; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">here</a><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">. ?</span></p> <h2>Ice Tray Battery</h2> <p><strong>Level of difficulty</strong>: Moderate</p> <p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;"><strong>What you need</strong>: Distilled white vinegar, five pieces of copper wire, five galvanized nails, ice tray and one LED light</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;"><strong>What to do</strong>: Wrap five nails with five pieces of copper wire and place them separately in the ice cube tray filled with vinegar. Create a circuit by placing the end of the copper wire not wrapped around the nail into the ice cube tray next to it until each section has one nail and one copper wire in it, and then place the LED light in the tray. You have just created a Voltaic battery! For further explanation, click </span><a href="http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/ice-tray-battery" style="line-height: 1.6em; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">here</a><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">.</span></p> <h2>Build a Light Bulb</h2> <p><strong>Level of difficulty</strong>: Challenging</p> <p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;"><strong>What you need</strong>: Eight D-sized batteries, mason jar or other clear glass, electrical tape, pie pan, scissors, toilet paper tube, mechanical pencil refills and two sets of small alligator clips.</span></p> <p><span style="line-height: 1.6em;"><strong>What to do</strong>: Connect the batteries positive to negative to create train of batteries. Place the toilet paper tube in the center of the pie pan and using electrical tape, attach the alligator clips and mechanical pencil refills to the tube. Place the mason jar/glass over the tube and connect the other end of the clips to the batteries. After the batteries have a few minutes to charge the circuit the mechanical refills will begin to glow and you will have a DIY light bulb. This is a great way to show that household items can be used in an innovative way. Exercise caution, as this experiment exerts heat and can cause the glass to become very warm. For further instruction, click </span><a href="http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/build-a-light-bulb-circuit-science" style="line-height: 1.6em; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);">here</a><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">.</span></p> <p>We hope these electrical experiments provide an enjoyable experience for dads and kids to spend quality time together while learning lots and having fun. Thank you to all the fathers who enlighten children and empower the thinkers of tomorrow. Happy Father’s Day?from everyone at Mr. Electric!</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/fun-electrical-experiments-for-fathers-day" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 11 Jun 2015 14:43:36 +0000 Mary Beth Farrell 5898 at http://www.33pulse.com Everything You Need To Know About Ceiling Fans http://www.33pulse.com/blog/everything-you-need-to-know-about-ceiling-fans <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Everything You Need To Know About Ceiling Fans</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/freelance-blog-everything-you-need-to-know-about-ceiling-fans.jpg?itok=Ic7cyduB" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/freelance-blog-everything-you-need-to-know-about-ceiling-fans.jpg?itok=Ic7cyduB" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Mary Beth Farrell</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Tuesday, June 9, 2015 - 12:26pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Are you looking to replace the aging light fixtures found throughout your home with an updated, multi-functional alternative? You may want to consider all the wonderful advantages ceiling fans have to offer.</p> <h2>Ceiling fans can boost your “cool” factor.</h2> <p>And we’re not just talking about their aesthetically pleasing ambiance. Ceiling fans are a practical, economical solution to reducing your cooling needs in the summer. By creating a wind chill effect, using ceiling fans throughout your home can keep you and your family comfortable enough to lower your thermostat temperature by 4-7 degrees F, saving you up to 30 percent on cooling costs. Still on the fence? As an added bonus, the wind generated by ceiling fans also makes it more difficult for pests to fly, keeping summer pests at bay. How’s that for cool?</p> <h2>Ceiling fans can make the most out of your heating system in the winter.</h2> <p>Say what? That’s right. Change the settings on your ceiling fans to spin clockwise, rather than their counterclockwise motion during the summer, and you’re in business! A clockwise motion forces air up, to the outer edges of the room, then down along walls to the floor, where it travels back to the center, once again rising. This motion helps equally distribute all that nice heated air from your HVAC system throughout your home, saving you much needed heating dollars.</p> <h2>How do you find the perfect spin?</h2> <p>Stand under your fan, and note the direction in which the blades rotate. (Don’t worry, it doesn’t matter which direction you face.) Remember, you want your blades to spin counterclockwise in the summer, clockwise in the winter. Wrong direction? Turn off the fan and locate the switch on the fan’s base, then simply flick the switch to the opposite direction. Done!</p> <h2>Ceiling fans have a lot to offer if they are carefully selected and installed.</h2> <p><strong>Choose the right blade size.</strong></p> <p>Want a cooling effect that doesn’t ruffle papers or other items in your home? Opt for larger blade sizes. They offer comparable cooling at a lower velocity than smaller blades. Don’t worry about the number of blades. This will not affect performance.</p> <p><strong>Properly size and locate fans.</strong></p> <p>Fans should be installed 7-9 feet above floors, 10-12 inches below ceilings and at least 18-24 inches from walls. Opt for 52-inch fans for rooms up to 400 square feet, 44-inch fans up to 225 square feet, and 42-inch fans up to 144 square feet. Rooms longer than 18 feet need multiple fans.</p> <p><strong>Find the right features.</strong></p> <p>Selecting easy-to-use models will encourage frequent fan use and the subsequent lowering of energy costs. You should carefully consider features and usage needs such as light intensity, fan speeds, noise level during operation, pull chains, and remote controls.</p> <p><strong>Remember, you get what you pay for.</strong></p> <p>Splurging a little on ceiling fans will earn you a model with quieter, smoother operation, more fan speeds, less issues, and longer warranty than bargain basement alternatives.</p> <p><strong>Ensure safe installation.</strong></p> <p>Professional installation as recommended by the manufacturer is essential to fan life, warranty, and most importantly, the safety of you and your family. Fans can weigh as much as 50 pounds! Safe installation should include an appropriate UL-listed electrical box made specifically for use with ceiling fans, secure mounting to a ceiling joist (or the use of a mounting bracket), and proper alignment and balancing.</p> <h2>A word to the wise…</h2> <p>Ceiling fans cool people, not rooms. Though they can help you save energy, they use it as well, so be sure to turn off ceiling fans when you leave the room to prevent wasted energy dollars. Don’t want to keep track? You may want to consider adding a motion sensor.</p> <p>Ready to boost comfort and lower energy costs with the help of a new ceiling fan? Mr. Electric<sup>?</sup> can help! Contact us today.</p> <p>?</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/everything-you-need-to-know-about-ceiling-fans" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Tue, 09 Jun 2015 17:26:09 +0000 Mary Beth Farrell 5896 at http://www.33pulse.com Common Electrical Problems in Your House http://www.33pulse.com/blog/common-electrical-problems <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Common Electrical Problems in Your House</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-common-electrical-problems-in-your-home.jpg?itok=7-reukdJ" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/code-mre-common-electrical-problems-in-your-home.jpg?itok=7-reukdJ" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Super User</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 2:30pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Have you been disregarding these common electrical problems around your home? You may be able to fix it yourself!</p> <h3><strong>Common Electrical Problems in Your House: Harmless or Hazardous?</strong></h3> <h4><strong>Harmless</strong></h4> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Loose Outlet Plug</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Turn off the breaker. Double check for voltage to the outlet (use a volt meter or plug something in). Unscrew the cover plate and add outlet shims until the outlet is flush with the wall.</span></p> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Broken Light Switch</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Turn off the circuit breaker (the light will go out when you choose the right one). Use a flathead screwdriver to remove the faceplate and a Phillips head to remove the light switch. Test the two wires connected to the screw for electricity. If it’s safe, disconnect and reassemble the light switch.</span></p> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Simple Short Circuit</strong><br /> Some electrical appliances, such as hairdryers, can frequently trip or short circuits. Reset the breaker. Repeated occurrences with the same appliance indicate it’s the appliance – not the electrical system. Without the appliance? A short in the wiring or receptacle needs to be addressed by a pro.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0.5in;"><strong>Cut or Damaged Extension Cord</strong><br /> Unplug both ends. Cut off the old plug. Gently score and peel back the insulation jacket. Strip each wire with a wire stripper, twisting each wire tightly at the end. Screw them into the back of the plug: black to gold; white to the silver screw; green to the green screw. Then close the plug and secure the wires. Cut in the middle? Purchase extra ends and turn the damaged cord into two new ones.</p> <h4><strong>Hazardous</strong></h4> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Flickering or Dimming Lights</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">This could be a sign of a poor connection and can lead to eventual arcing – loose/corroded connections making intermittent contact that could result in sparking, overheating, and fire.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Light Bulbs Burn Out Frequently</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">If you’re experience frequent bulb blowouts, it could be more serious than overuse. You may have a loose connection in the socket or circuit. Recessed lights that frequently fail? Nearby insulation could be causing overheating and these fixtures are designed to shut off to prevent fire.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Dead Outlets</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Dead outlets can result from a tripped poor connection (and possible arcing), or a tripped breaker due to excessive heat buildup resulting in melted wires or outlets.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Warm Outlets or Switches</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Unless it is a dimming switch, warm outlets are as a serious safety concern and should be addressed by a pro immediately.</span></p> <p style="margin-left:.5in;"><strong>Frequently Tripping Breakers</strong><br /><span style="line-height: 1.6em;">Usually a sign the circuit is overloaded and using too much electricity. You should add a circuit or consider upgrading your electrical service.</span></p> <h3><strong>Electrical problems have you in over your head?</strong></h3> <p>Don’t be a DIY daredevil. Dealing with electrical is not like dealing with dry wall - electrical problems can bite! And while drywall can be cheaply and easily replaced, you cannot. If you don’t have the tools or expertise necessary to tackle these common electrical problems, Mr. Electric<sup>?</sup> can help. Don’t ignore potential dangers. <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Contact <em>Mr. Electric</em></a> for help today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/common-electrical-problems" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 14 May 2015 19:30:09 +0000 Super User 5874 at http://www.33pulse.com Power Behind March Madness http://www.33pulse.com/blog/power-behind-march-madness <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Power Behind March Madness</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me_-_power_behind_march_madness_blog.jpg?itok=nFONP1Kl" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="830" height="415" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/me_-_power_behind_march_madness_blog.jpg?itok=nFONP1Kl" width="830" height="415" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Friday, March 13, 2015 - 2:31pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p><strong>By Maddie Ogletree</strong></p> <p>What goes on behind the scenes of March Madness often goes unmentioned. The action is up front, while the lights and cameras are working hard in the background. Some major aspects of the March Madness experience happen without a hitch, and sometimes they’re the hardest to manage. No wonder there was a lighting mishap during the Super Bowl in 2013.</p> <p>Amidst all the madness this March, take a moment to notice the electrical components powering the stadiums, such as:</p> <h2>AV Systems</h2> <p>The music and sound effects heard during the event can all be attributed to the thousands of cables running throughout stadiums across the country, linking the AV control rooms to the speakers above the court. When stadiums are built, every single cable is intricately installed to enable you to experience the sights and sounds of March Madness the way you’re able. Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, host of the Final Four and championship games, reports about 764,000 cables in their audio and video setup alone!</p> <h2><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/electrical-system-maintenance">Back Up Generators </a></h2> <p>To ensure that the arena doesn’t go dark mid-play, backup generators are a must to make sure everything runs smoothly during the games. It might not be the first concern to pop into your mind, but in an emergency or accidental power failure backup generators are the heroes of the game. Most arenas are prepared for these events and have multiple generators ready to go in the event of a power failure.</p> <h2><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/home-lighting-design">Lighting </a></h2> <p>How the stadium stays perfectly lit is not often considered, but it’s a necessity for these games that can be tough to power. Recently, NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas updated their lighting to a more sustainable system. The new system draws 337 kilowatts of energy at full power – 60 percent less than their previous system. That’s huge, especially when their stadium now houses more than 65,000 LEDs. Imagine keeping all of those lights functioning properly during the entire South Regional game.</p> <h2>Video Boards</h2> <p>Keeping up with the scores at games is easy with the giant screens present at every modern sports arena. But most people don’t realize the energy that is needed to show those replays on the big screen. While it does take quite a bit of energy, arenas are starting to focus on using sustainable sources of energy. The Moda Center, which will be hosting second and third round games for this year’s March Madness, purchases 100 percent renewable energy programs.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/power-behind-march-madness" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Fri, 13 Mar 2015 19:31:28 +0000 Brad Roop 5551 at http://www.33pulse.com 5 Reasons To Love Surge Protection http://www.33pulse.com/blog/5-reasons-to-love-surge-protection <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>5 Reasons To Love Surge Protection</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/5_reasons_to_love_surge_protection_blog.jpg?itok=9c-secKF" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/5_reasons_to_love_surge_protection_blog.jpg?itok=9c-secKF" width="3058" height="1496" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 2:27pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><div class="row"> <div class="col-md-5"><a href="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/full-0-lg/public/mre-infographic-surge-protection-campaign-2015-corp-rev2.png" target="_blank"><img alt="5 Reasons To Love Surge Protection Infographic" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/mre-infographic-surge-protection-campaign-2015-corp-rev2.png" title="5 Reasons To Love Surge Protection" /></a></div> <div class="col-md-7"> <h3 class="h4">1. They protect the electronics we are addicted to.</h3> <p>We rely heavily on electronics for everything from communicating with each other and checking the weather to preparing meals and keeping clothes cleaned. All of these devices, even your home's LED lights, use electronic circuit boards to operate which can be highly sensitive to power surges.</p> <h3 class="h4"><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/what-to-expect-when-you-have-a-whole-house-surge-protector-installed-in-your-home">2. They've got you totally covered.</a></h3> <p>A whole house surge protector prevents damage not only to your larger electronics appliances, but also to every outlet and electronic device in your home, offering protection for everything from your e-reader to your exercise machine.</p> <h3 class="h4"><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/surge-protection-not-as-costly-as-you-think">3. They're inexpensive.</a></h3> <p>For far less than the cost of one of your major appliances (and many of your smaller ones), you can protect every electronic device in your home. You simply can't afford not to protect your home with a whole house surge protector.</p> <h3 class="h4">4. They come highly recommended.</h3> <p>Organizations from the <a href="http://www.nfpa.org"> National Fire Protection Association</a> to the <a href="https://www.disastersafety.org"> Institute for Business and Home Safety</a> recommend surge protectors.</p> <h3 class="h4"><a href="http://www.33pulse.com/blog/surge-protection-and-power-conditioning-how-they-work-together">5. They compliment surge protection power strips.</a></h3> <p>60-80 percent of power surges start inside your home. While whole house surge protection prevents outside surges from entering through the breaker box, surge strips protect electronics from power fluctuations occurring from within the home.</p> <p>Still have questions? No problem, we are here to help you! Contact <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us"> Mr. Electric</a> today!</p> </div> </div> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/5-reasons-to-love-surge-protection" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Thu, 12 Mar 2015 19:27:56 +0000 Brad Roop 5550 at http://www.33pulse.com Surge Protection and Power Conditioning: How They Work Together http://www.33pulse.com/blog/surge-protection-and-power-conditioning-how-they-work-together <div class="field field-name-title field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><h2>Surge Protection and Power Conditioning: How They Work Together</h2></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-field-image field-type-image field-label-hidden image"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><img class="img-responsive" data-echo="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-surgeprotectionandpowerconditioninghowtheyworktogether.jpg?itok=s1cxIx--" data-icon="/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/loader/loader-7.gif" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/profiles/dwyer/modules/contrib/lazyloader/image_placeholder.gif" width="830" height="415" alt="" /><noscript><img class="img-responsive" src="https://d37g4ob56wd8h0.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/600x300/public/content/blog/images/mre-surgeprotectionandpowerconditioninghowtheyworktogether.jpg?itok=s1cxIx--" width="830" height="415" alt="" /></noscript></div></div></div><div class="field field-name-author field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Brad Roop</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-post-date field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even">Friday, March 6, 2015 - 2:56pm</div></div></div><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden body"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Adequate <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/surge-protection">surge protection </a> does not begin and end with point-of-use power strips. Multiple layers of protection are necessary to safeguard your sensitive appliances and electronic devices. You’ve invested a great deal of money in them - now you need to protect them.</p> <h3>Surge protectors and power conditioners: Here they come to save the day!</h3> <ul><li><strong>Your primary line of defense: The <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/surge-protection">whole house surge protector </a></strong></li> </ul><p>Whole house surge protection, installed between street power lines and your home, or between your meter and breaker box, offer your appliances the protection they need against today’s common but unexpected spikes and surges. Diverting excess power to ground, these devices protect both your electronics and your wallet from the dangers of spikes and surges that could leave you with smoking gear and a hefty replacement bill.</p> <ul><li><strong>The dynamic duo: Point-of-use surge protectors with<a href="http://www.33pulse.com/home-energy-savings"> power conditioners </a></strong></li> </ul><p>Because a whole house surge protector cannot handle 100 percent of surges, you need backup. That’s where point-of-use surge protection devices with power conditioners come in. Installed at individual outlets in your home, these devices also shed excess voltage through ground in the event a spike or surge overcomes your whole house surge protector. They also have the added benefit of noise filtering. There are two types: less expensive models that are destroyed internally – but preserve your gear – in the event of a surge, and more expensive models that can handle all but the most extreme surges without destruction.</p> <h3>It’s electricity – why does it need a “noise filter”?</h3> <p>Have you ever been watching TV or listening to the radio when someone in an adjacent room operates a blender or vacuum? Oftentimes the result will be static on your TV or an annoying buzz emitting from speakers courtesy of “noise” transmitted through the electrical lines in your home. That’s where a power conditioner comes in.</p> <h3>Is this the same as a power strip?</h3> <p>Those cheap $20 power strips from your local retail store are not the same as a surge protector with a power conditioner. While cheaper, this is definitely an instance where you get what you pay for - a couple extra outlets and some minor surge protection. In the event of a major event, however, they can fail your appliances and sometimes catch fire. Premium, point-of-use surge protection with power conditioning not only adequately protects your appliances from surges, but also:</p> <ul><li>Filters incoming electrical current and cleans it to provide the correct voltage, allowing electronics to operate safely.</li> <li>Prevents minor drops and disturbances in the power supply to your electronics and appliances that can result in reduced efficiency, higher energy bills and shortened lifespan.</li> <li>Offers filtration between components plugged into the same power conditioner.</li> </ul><p>Protect your gear and run at peak performance with help from the perfect team. Have surge protection and power conditioning equipment installed in your home with the help of <a href="http://www.33pulse.com/contact-us">Mr. Electric? </a> today.</p> </div></div></div><div class="field field-name-node-link field-type-ds field-label-hidden"><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><a href="/blog/surge-protection-and-power-conditioning-how-they-work-together" class="">Read more</a></div></div></div> Fri, 06 Mar 2015 20:56:00 +0000 Brad Roop 5538 at http://www.33pulse.com

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